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Poster: cooperway4 Date: Apr 2, 2011 9:12pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Not PD

Medallion TV Enterprises, Inc is another one of those entities with a history of fraudulent copyright claims. Take for instance the movie The Mask (1961).

Here's the fraudulent claim:

Type of Work: Motion Picture
Registration Number / Date: RE0000447000 / 1989-11-24
Renewal registration for: LP0000027111 / 1961-11-16
Title: The Mask. By Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Claimant: Medallion TV Enterprises, Inc. (PWH)
Copyright Note: C.O. correspondence.

Variant title: The Mask.
Names: Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc.
Medallion TV Enterprises, Inc.


AND here's the proper renewal:


Type of Work: Motion Picture
Registration Number / Date: RE0000433340 / 1989-08-21
Renewal registration for: LP0000027111 / 1961-11-11
Title: The Mask; motion picture. By Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Claimant: Warner Brothers, Inc. (PWH)
Copyright Note: C.O. correspondence.

Variant title: The Mask
Names: Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc.
Warner Brothers, Inc.



Please do more research before making claims that PD movies aren't. There's plenty of obvious breaches to keep you busy without attacking the Public Domain.

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Poster: Video-Cellar Date: Apr 2, 2011 10:45pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Not PD

Actually, no Medallion TV Enterprises was one of the legitimate TV distribution companies. They licensed (and often purchased outright) the copyright to many independent and studio b-pictures during the 1960-80s. By their demise they had collected a catalogue of about 60 films they owned the copyrights to outright. When the company folded it's catalgue went to Vidmark, then through a few other companies before ending up with Kit Parker, the current owner of the catalogue.

It's not unusual for a film to be renewed by both the original owner and a subsequent owner. There is correspondence on both "The Mask" renewals so someon would have to seek access to copyright office records to find out what the rights situation on the specific movie is. The most likely explanations are that Medallion was unsure of the rights they were purchasing with the film (i.e. first term and not renewal term or a license and not ownership of copyright) or that, upon selling the film, Warners failed to remove the copyright from its tickle list (that is the industry term for a renewals reminder list.)

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Poster: billbarstad Date: Apr 2, 2011 9:19pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Not PD

Both of these look valid. The first looks like a transfer of copyright ownership of The Mask from Warner to Medallion. Even if the first is invalid, it doesn't mean that Medallion's copyright of Monster from the Ocean Floor is too. Please do more thinking before dismissing copyright claims.